Your Guide for a Pet-Friendly Thanksgiving

 

Group of friends eating outdoor. Woman feeding her dog

Thanksgiving brings families together around the dinner table which includes every family member – including pets. It’s hard to withstand those puppy dog eyes any time of year, and can seem next to impossible at holiday meals during the “season of giving.” Despite all the begging though, most of our holiday foods can cause major issues for pets.

For the holidays we have compiled this helpful list of foods to help keep you have a safe and pet-friendly Thanksgiving.

The Good (in moderation):

Turkey — As a lean protein, turkey can be good for your cat or dog. Stick with well-cooked white meat and remove the skin, which can be hard to digest. Read the rest of this entry »

“Howl”-oween at Goldorado!

Portrait of couple of dogs in disguise for Halloween

Dogs in disguise for Halloween

Candy? Check. Spooky Spotify playlist? Check. Hot dog costume for your Dachshund? Check. There is much to love about Halloween, and for all of us pet owners it can be a fun opportunity to dress pets up.

Although we think of Halloween as full of innocent fun, many pets can easily become stressed or be put in compromising situations. The constant ringing of the doorbell, strangers walking around in the dark, unattended candy bowls, and even some pranks can cause pets undue stress and increase their risk of illness or injury.

Fortunately, it’s possible to have a pet-friendly Halloween. Our pet safety tips are here to help you have a spooky (but not so scary!) night:

Read the rest of this entry »

Top 5 Reasons for a Christmas Vet Visit

funny dog on background Christmas tree

Nothing can ruin your holidays like an emergency room visit, yet this can be one of the busiest times of the year for veterinary clinics. Take preventive measures to p rotect your pets this holiday season and be aware of these top five most common holiday emergencies:

1. Holiday and Ornaments Tinsel

While not toxic, this is very attractive to pets, particularly cats. The shiny, dangling decoration reflects light and can move in the slightest draft — appearing to come alive to watchful critters. The problem with tinsel is that once it’s consumed, it can cause serious injury to your pet. If not caught in time, this foreign body ingestion could actually be fatal as it twists and bunches inside your pet’s intestines. Immediate veterinary care is required. In addition, bright and colorful tree ornaments can attract your pet’s curiosity. Place glass, aluminum and paper ornaments higher up on the tree as these objects in particular are choking and chewing hazards. Broken pieces form sharp edges that may lacerate your pet’s mouth, throat and intestines. Read the rest of this entry »

How to Neuter a Peep…

Happy Easter everybody! Our technician Julie had a new litter join the family (at least for the weekend anyways…) and brought them in for check-ups. It turns out that Peeps get “twitterpated” just like all our other animals so Dr. Prince recommended “fixing” these little guys so Julie wouldn’t be overrun after the holiday.

EasterPost1

Thankfully our surgery team was up to the task and the patient was prepped for his procedure. Preanesthetic bloodwork, pre-operative pain medication, and sedation are all important steps we take to ensure the safety of every patient before surgery: Read the rest of this entry »