A Gentle and Healthy Approach to Children and Pet Loss

Children and pet loss are an emotional combo If we consider pets to be members of the family, our children certainly feel the same way. Kids tend to develop strong attachments to pets, often relating to them in the same way as siblings, playmates, and trusted confidants. The loss of a pet may be a child’s first experience with death, and how their grief is handled by the family can impact them throughout their life.

Children and pet loss is often viewed as a tricky subject, but it doesn’t have to be. Your friends at Goldorado Animal Hospital want you to know that we’re here to support you and your family as you navigate the aftermath of pet loss together. Read the rest of this entry »

Ick-Ick! Parasite Prevention and Best Practices for Removing a Tick from a Pet

Removing a tick from a pet is an important part of outdoor pet safetyWith the arrival of tick medications like Bravecto (which is taken once every 3 months and can totally kill ticks), it is possible to avoid the unpleasantness of the “icky” tick.  However, if your pet hasn’t been on an effective medication, beware. Because in the case of ticks, they’re everywhere! They lie in wait on tall grass and brush, are predominant in wooded areas, and active all year except winter, so it’s a good idea to know the score about removing a tick from a pet.

The Yuck Factor

Few bugs inspire such hatred from people. Related to spiders and mites, ticks are found around the world and throughout North America. The difference between these arachnids is that ticks are parasitic blood-suckers that just so happen to spread terrible diseases (like Lyme disease and Rocky Mountain spotted fever). Read the rest of this entry »

Rabbits Need Dentistry, Too!

rabbit needing dentistryBy Dr. Susan Garlinghouse

Most pet owners are aware that dogs and cats need dental care during their lifetime, but did you know that dental disease is amongst the most common problems in rabbits as well? Yes, rabbits need dentistry, too!

Rabbits are different from most other pet species, in that their teeth grow continuously throughout their entire life.  This is an adaptation due to the high fiber diet they eat in the wild, requiring more chewing and resulting in increased wear.  This constant growth is true not only for the front incisors, but the molars and ‘cheek teeth’ as well. Read the rest of this entry »

Too Hot to Trot: Summer Pet Safety 101

Summer pet safety can help prevent heat stroke in petsThe dog days of summer are in full swing, and here in Cameron Park that means plenty of heat, sun, haze (and perhaps a strong urge to nap during the hottest part of the day). As the season progresses and temperatures continue to rise, it’s important for pet owners to take the well-being of their pets into consideration, when it comes to summertime hazards such as heat stroke, dehydration, and noise-related anxiety.

Being aware of the risks and planning ahead are the keys to enjoying some fun in the sun with our pets. Whether you are at home or on the go, keep our summer pet safety tips in mind. Read the rest of this entry »

Taming Dog Aggression

By Susan Garlinghouse DVM

Puppies usually learn how to interact with other friendly dogs during early life . However, for a variety of reasons, that doesn’t always happen, and such pups can grow up with poor social skills, unable to decipher and understand the body language of other dogs. As they mature, they can develop fear-based dog aggression—barking, growling, lunging or worse, which often gets more ingrained with time.

It would intuitively seem like the best way to discourage such behavior is to rebuke the dog or give a quick pop on the leash to reprimand for dog agression. However, doing so actually makes things worse, as punishment simply reinforces his anxiety that being around other dogs means bad things will happen. Read the rest of this entry »

Kitten and Puppy Wellness Plans: Your Pet’s First Steps in Veterinary Care

Adopting a fur baby into your family is an exciting time. The joy of watching your sweet puppy or kitten get the zoomies around their new home… the adorable stop-drop-and-nap in the middle of anything… the snuggles. But with parenthood – even pet parenthood – comes the responsibility for the health and well-being of your little one.

The team at Goldorado Animal Hospital understands that the first year of pet parenthood can be an expensive time. Setting your puppy or kitten up for a lifetime of health and happiness takes an initial investment in their veterinary care. And while this investment will pay off in spades as your pet lives its best life under your care, we want quality veterinary care to be accessible to all the pets of Cameron Park; which is why we have created our kitten and puppy wellness plans. Read the rest of this entry »

Starting Down the Right Path with Puppy Socialization

Puppy SocializatiionBy Susan Garlinghouse DVM

One of the most important steps to having a great adult dog is to  provide thorough puppy socialization, especially during the critical learning stages between 7 – 16 weeks.  Puppies develop much of their personality and confidence in their world during their early life, so exposing them to lots of new, positive experiences is an important step towards a happy and self-assured adult.

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The Power of Prevention: Rattlesnakes and Pets

rattlesnakes and petsCalifornians are no strangers to rattlesnakes. Like it or not, they are a part of our landscape and we must learn to live alongside them safely. As humans, we adapt to and avoid disturbing them, but our animal friends do not always catch on as quickly.

Rattlesnakes and pets shouldn’t mix. Preventing a bite is preferable to treating one, leaving proactive pet owners searching for ways to protect their four-legged family members. At Goldorado Animal Hospital, we take teaching our clients about rattlesnakes and pets very seriously.

Read the rest of this entry »

How Not to Say “Bite Me”: Avoiding Dog Bites

Avoid Do Bites

By Susan Garlinghouse DVM

This is National Dog Bite Prevention Week, so let’s talk about how to avoid being either the owner or victim of dog bites.  According to the Centers of Disease Control, 4.5 million people are bitten by dogs every year, with 1 in 5 (that’s over 800,000) requiring medical attention.  The most common victims are young children and the elderly, and most are bitten during everyday activities by a dog familiar to them.

Any dog can bite if provoked, regardless of size, age, breed or gender.  Usually, dogs bite as a reaction—either out of fear, from pain, to protect their territory or possessions, or during play that gets out of hand. Read the rest of this entry »